Stan Lee Reveals How DC Comics Could Make A Good Movie

Stan Lee, a man who created, refined, and developed many of the Marvel characters that have become household names like Spider-Man, The Hulk, and Thor, is someone you give your undivided attention to when he offers up some of his decades worth of wisdom. And last week at Fan Expo Canada, which was his last public appearance in Canada, Lee offered up some advice for Warner Bros.' DC films.

During the Q&A session, a young boy wearing a Suicide Squad t-shirt asked the comic book legend, "How do you think DC can make a hit with critics?" The bold question garnered a lively applause from the audience, and when they quieted down, the 93-year-old gave a short and confident reply, "Let me write it."

Based on how poorly the first three films in the DC Cinematic Universe have been received by film critics, that might not be such a bad idea. "Top Critics" from Rotten Tomatoes gave Man of Steel, Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, and Suicide Squad harsh scores of 49%, 23%, and 19%, respectively.

Even though Lee never wrote a film that was produced, he did pen a script treatment for a live-action Spider-Man movie back in the '90s, and in the '70s, he co-wrote (dictated on tape) two movie scripts — "Night of the Witch," which was about a witch killing only evildoers, and "The Man Who Talked to God," which was about (you guessed it) a man who talked to God — with Lloyd Kaufman, the co-founder of Troma Entertainment and the creator of The Toxic Avenger.

Additionally, Lee was asked which comic book is a favorite of his that he had no part in creating. Surprisingly, he expressed a love for DC's intergalactic bounty hunter. "What was his name? Big, tough guy? Lobo," he answered after briefly struggling to come up with his name. "Did you ever see, Lobo? I thought he was a character that should be a Marvel character, 'cause he was the worst human being (he's actually an alien from planet Czarnia) on Earth, and he was so evil and vile and strong and ugly, and I loved him! But he belonged to DC. But they never knew what to do with him."