Apocalypse Is Way More Powerful Than Any Other Character In X-Men Franchise According To Simon Kinberg

X-Men Apocalypse
(Photo: Twentieth Century Fox)

During a video Q&A with fans, X-Men: Apocalypse executive producer Simon Kinberg called the upcoming film the biggest X-Men movie yet.

And, unsurprisingly, the way you make your superhero epics bigger and bigger is to raise the stakes and to create bigger and badder villains.

"Unlike the other mutant villains we've had, [Apocalypse] has lots of different powers," Kinberg said. "And so you see that over the span of the movie. Usually we have Magneto with his magnetism, or you have Shaw and the way he can kind of absorb energy. This is a character who is certainly way more powerful than any of the characters we've ever seen in the franchise."

You can see the full video below.

Since the dawn of civilization, he was worshiped as a god. Apocalypse, the first and most powerful mutant from Marvel’s X-Men universe, amassed the powers of many other mutants, becoming immortal and invincible. Upon awakening after thousands of years, he is disillusioned with the world as he finds it and recruits a team of powerful mutants, including a disheartened Magneto (Michael Fassbender), to cleanse mankind and create a new world order, over which he will reign. As the fate of the Earth hangs in the balance, Raven (Jennifer Lawrence) with the help of Professor X (James McAvoy) must lead a team of young X-Men to stop their greatest nemesis and save mankind from complete destruction.

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3 Comments

    • CB116949
    • 187 Posts in 9 Months

    Would have never guessed that one.

    • CB122909
    • 13 Posts in 8 Months

    Phoenix.

    • AdrFax
    • 22 Posts in 8 Months

    Is Kinberg's word still valid anymore? After the whole Fant4stic debacle it's quite challenging to take him seriously. Sure, it's unfair to discredit his overall involvement out of a few mistakes, but given how he allowed himself to become a spokesperson for the studio's nonsensical ideas over his better judgment, the public can't tell how sincere he is when he's divulging thoughts of his own.

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