Man Claims To Have Captured The Biggest Sighting Ever Of Loch Ness Monster On Film

One real-life monster hunter claims he may have the best evidence yet of the existence of the Loch Ness Monster. Eoin O'Faodhagain has released a 38-second clip of a shape floating along the surface of the legendary Scottish lake. O'Faodhagain estimated the shape to be around 30-feet long, and it can be seen swimming along before dipping below the surface without a trace.

The Nessie spotter has "confirmed" his sighting with the Official Loch Ness Monster Sightings Register, and it's believed the footage shows the largest sighting seen on record. The register currently has 1,141 sightings listed from the year 565 until present, including nearly a dozen from this year alone.

"The object in my estimation is at least 30 feet long as shown by solid blackness in the water, rising to at least 4 to 5 feet high. It was amazing to see such a large image caught on video compared to my previous sightings," O'Faodhagain told the tabloid. "This sighting is also special because there was no boat traffic or wave disturbance in the video and the surface of the loch was calm."

You can see the video clip in question here.

This isn't the monster hunter's first run-in with Nessie, either. O'Faodhagain reported two sightings this January three days apart from one another.

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"I just went into the webcam at 2.11 pm and immediately saw what I could make out was 2 objects splashing around in the bay about 100 feet apart.They were 2 black objects throwing up a lot of water, and from the distance were large looking in the water," the register says of his sighting on January 22nd. "Then the one on the right submerged, and then came up again.The one on the left did the same thing intermittently. They were visible for up to 3 minutes, and then there was nothing. They could have been a couple of feet out of the water and maybe a dozen feet long."

Whether fact or fiction, some suggest the Loch Ness Monster myth alone is responsible of injecting upwards of an eight-figure sum — upwards of $48 million USD some years— into the Scottish economy on an annual basis.