Microsoft Documents Indicate Who The Typical Xbox Gamer Is

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What kind of audience does Microsoft consider for its Xbox? Well, some new info has come to light, courtesy of the team at Windows Central. It's managed to get hold of some documents that indicate just who the company is looking at when it comes to a core demographic for its console.

According to response from 2,000 gamers polled in the U.S. (distributed through developmental partners for better reach), it shows that 58 percent of all Xbox gamers are male, with 42 percent female. That's not too bad of a balance at all.

Furthermore, the largest age group is the 25-34 bracket with 28 percent, followed by 35-44 (23 percent), 18-24 (18 percent), 45-54 (15 percent), 13-17 (10 percent) and 55-65 (six percent).

Out of those polled, 45 percent noted that they live with their spouse, while 23 percent noted that they live with their parents. Meanwhile, monetary-wise, $50,000-$74,999 and $75,000-$99,999 (both at 21 percent) were the highest in terms of funding.

There were also social behavior breakdowns in the findings, with 53 percent of all users showing some kind of interest in "Socializing," based on spending the most time through Xbox Live services (generally around 17 hours a week). Meanwhile, 49 percent noted interest in "Exploring," with about 15 games per year in their libraries; and 31 percent noted they're in the "Achievement" Group, working on getting a higher Gamerscore than others. They indicate they spend about two times as long getting these Achievements, spending 37 months on Xbox Live on average, and playing 14 hours of multiplayer a week.

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There are quite a few interesting stats in the report listed above, and one has to wonder if Microsoft will be using these as the basis to improve its forthcoming game console, the yet-to-be-finalized Project Scorpio. There's a huge amount of buzz regarding the hardware going into E3 next month, as that will likely be the place where it gets its first reveal, complete with a games showcase. We'll have to see how well these stats hold up for Microsoft as it preps the new hardware, while still sticking by its large Xbox base.