Workaholics Episode With Chris D'Elia as a Pedophile Removed From Hulu and Amazon

Days after sexual harassment allegations against Chris D'Elia surfaced online, most streaming platforms are removing a controversial Workaholics episode in which the comedian plays a pedophile. In the episode, the first season's "To Friend a Predator," D'Elia appears as a child molester that befriends the characters played by Adam Devine, Anders Holm, and Blake Anderson. The episode has since been removed from Comedy Central, Hulu, and Amazon's Prime Video service. Comedy Central has also removed the comedian's stand-up special White Male. Black Comic from all of its platforms.

D'Elia also recently had a three-episode arc on Netflix's You, another role in which he harassed a 15-year-old girl in the show.

Throughout the last week on Twitter, multiple women have come forward with stories on how D'Elia allegedly used unwanted sexual advances on them through social media. At the time of the alleged contact, some of the women were as young as 16. D'Elia has since released a statement through TMZ in which he denies the claims.

“I know I have said and done things that might have offended people during my career, but I have never knowingly pursued any underage women at any point. All of my relationships have been both legal and consensual and I have never met or exchanged any inappropriate photos with the people who have tweeted about me. That being said, I really am truly sorry. I was a dumb guy who ABSOLUTELY let myself get caught up in my lifestyle. That’s MY fault. I own it. I’ve been reflecting on this for some time now and I promise I will continue to do better,” D'Elia's statement read.

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He's also starred in Whitney Cummings' sitcom Whitney, causing her to release a statement in which she said she's "devastated" by the allegations levied against D'Elia.

“It’s taken me a couple days to process the information I have learned about Chris. I’m devastated and enraged by what I’ve read and learned. This is a pattern of predatory behavior. This abuse of power is enabled by silence. Now that I’m aware, I won’t be silent,” Cummings tweeted. “Girls should be able to be a fan of a comedian they admire without being a sexual target. It’s the adult’s responsibility to be an adult.”

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