Saturday Night Live Takes NSFW Direction With Sleepy Hollow Legend

Saturday Night Live took a very NSFW direction with a Sleepy Hollow sketch. John Mulaney and company decided to riff on the legend of the Headless Horseman in a fairly raunchy way. The comedians all pondered “creative” uses for the lonely head that the rider had in his possessions. It was another strange moment in an evening with sketches that veered all over the map. Some of the highlights from Mulaney’s last trip to the show were revisited. That strange LaGuardia sketch, Meme Uncle and others got another moment in the sun. But, just like the openers for this season, things can quickly dissolve into absurd concepts in a very short time. That’s how you end up with the veteran comedian joking about using a head to relieve his “needs” with Pete Davidson in strange wigs and costumes. Online, people seemed to enjoy this one, and you can watch it all down below.

Comic book fans will know the comedian from his part in Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. Spider-Ham might not have been a normal character for most audiences, but now Peter Porker is pretty beloved. Back in 2018, Mulaney actually pitched a Spider-Ham solo movie. Check out what he had in mind down below.

“[Spider-Ham] is a fun guy who is capable of great rage,” Mulaney joked. “To go see him back at the Daily Beagle – I could see a Watergate-like story at the Beagle where he’s both a reporter and Spider-Ham by night… [I] never thought that the Clark Kents and the Peter Parkers leaned enough into the day job," he continued. “This would be more like The Post or All The President’s Men or Spotlight, but we’d make it family-friendly. Lots of bacon jokes, or, ‘that’s hamfisted.'”

Comicbook.com’s Chris Killian reviewed Into the Spider-Verse for the site. He, like most audiences, couldn’t get enough of Miles Morales and his friends.

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“Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is pure exhilaration. The movie brilliantly manages to add to the Spider-Man mythos in an exciting way while also skewering many of the cliches we’ve all come to expect after over a half dozen live-action movies and multiple origin stories,” Killian observed. “For starters, the animation is smooth, vibrant, and full of kinetic energy. Comic panels or thought bubbles pop up when characters are using their inner monologue in a way that makes it really feel like you’re watching a comic book. Other movies have tried to replicate the look of comics in the past, but Spider-Verse has arguably found the most successful and least distracting way of doing so.”

Did you enjoy Mulaney on SNL? Let us know down in the comments!