Conspiracy Theorist Says Mayan Calendar Predicted End of the World Next Week

The year was 2012 and conspiracy theorists far and wide thought the end of the world was near. Due to readings of the Mayan calendar, theorists expected the world to cease to exist on December 21st. At the time, it was a theory so widespread that Roland Emmerich ended up making a blockbuster movie out of it. As it turns out, the initial batch of readings might have been inaccurate. Instead, the world could end on June 21st – like the June 21st that's just over a week away.

In a series of tweets that have now been deleted, scientist and Fullbright scholar Paolo Tagaloguin explained that the Mayan predictions could still prove accurate due to our shift to the Gregorian calendar. As Taglaloguin said in now-deleted tweets, we lost out on 11 days per years by using the Gregorian Calendar as opposed to the Julian Calendar. In fact, we're still in 2012 according to the Julian Calendar. Tagaloguin has since deleted his Twitter and Instagram accounts.

“Following the Julian Calendar, we are technically in 2012…," the scientist wrote in the now-deleted tweets (via the Sun). "The number of days lost in a year due to the shift into Gregorian Calendar is 11 days… For 268 years using the Gregorian Calendar (1752-2020) times 11 days = 2,948 days. 2,948 days / 365 days (per year) = 8 years."

As only the internet could, the speculation and conspiracy has become a mainstay topic on social media, turning into a meme in and of itself.

"So in 10 days it'll be the end of the world according to the mayan calendar..." @iamelmahdi tweeted. "LET'S F--KINGGGG GOOOOOOOO."

"Please adjust your schedule accordingly," @IPOT1776 joked, we think.

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Even the stans came out in full force, being sure to stock up on their fancams to celebrate the end of the world. "Saw an article that the mayan calendar was wrong and the world is gonna end next week," @ot9momoland11 wroted. "Might as well do what i love the most, binge watch momoland vids."

As you know by now, the 2012 predictions were wrong – so here's to hoping the 2021 ones aren't accurate, either.

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