Cyberpunk Pioneer William Gibson Slams 'Cyberpunk 2077' As GTA Clone

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The world finally got the reveal we've been waiting for during the Xbox E3 2018 press conference this weekend when CD Projekt RED unveiled their highly anticipated follow-up RPG experience, Cyberpunk 2077. The team responsible for the iconic The Witcher gaming franchise are back when a new role-playing experience, but this time much more high-tech than its fantasy-driven predecessor. The internet went crazy after the reveal, and the hype was real ... at least for most. Apparently, the "pioneer" of the Cyberpunk genre was not as impressed.

Author of Neuromancer William Gibson took to Twitter to just absolutely lay into the upcoming game, essentially calling it uninspired. According to the writer, "The trailer for Cyberpunk 2077 strikes me as GTA skinned-over with a generic 80s retro-future, but hey, that's just me."

The reaction to that bold statement was interesting, with varied responses mid-hype:

Many disagreed with his assement, especially given that it wasn't a full-blown first look but more of a teaser cinematic. Others chimed in mentioning that the "GTA Mod" angle was a first thought for them as well. Both sides had numerous arguments, which makes the comparison very interesting in terms of player perception.

For comparison, this is how CD Projekt RED describes the game and its choice-driven story:

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"The game follows the story of V — a hired gun on the rise in Night City, the most violent and dangerous metropolis of the corporate-ruled future. A robust character creator will allow players to choose V’s gender, visual appearance, character class, as well as historical background — all of which may influence the shape of the game.

With dozens of hours of main story arc quests, and many more of additional activities, there’s always something to see and do in Night City. Players will experience all of it entirely through V’s eyes, with an interactive dialogue system that gives them greater narrative agency."

You decide. Do you agree with Gibson's assessment, or do you think he's way off? Sound off with your thoughts in the comment section below!