Ridley Scott's Abandoned 'I Am Legend' Adaptation Makeup Tests Emerge

In 2007, I Am Legend landed in theaters starring Will Smith and directed by Francis Lawrence. 10 years earlier, Ridley Scott was developing the project before it was ultimately abandoned, with makeup artist Alec Gillis now taking to Instagram to show off the makeup tests he had developed to bring the story to life.

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Ridley Scott’s version of I AM LEGEND was to have starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and featured ‘hemocytes’ realized as makeup characters. I think we did our design exploratory in about 1997 ( is that right @h2originals ?) Ridley was influenced by wax figures from the 17th century. We did a test on a single female subject to show her in a few stages of emaciation. The appliance pieces were sculpted by @ryankennethpeterson and Steve Koch and applied by @Tom_woodruffjr , myself and Barry Koper. Shortly after we shot the test at ADI Warner’s decided not to make the movie. The budget was coming in 10 mil higher than desired. It all got shelved until the Francis Lawrence/ Will Smith version years later. We did get an interview on that version but there was next to no interest in makeup fx. Contribbing sculptors were @schellsculpturestudio and Jeff Boccaccio. Tech work helmed by @h2originals. Paint by Mike Larrabee.

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Gillis shared the images while noting, "Ridley Scott’s version of I AM LEGEND was to have starred Arnold Schwarzenegger and featured ‘hemocytes’ realized as makeup characters. I think we did our design exploratory in about 1997."

The 2007 version of the film instead relied primarily on CGI to create the terrifying monsters.

"Ridley was influenced by wax figures from the 17th century," Gillis pointed out. "We did a test on a single female subject to show her in a few stages of emaciation."

He added, "Shortly after we shot the test at ADI [Warner Bros.] decided not to make the movie. The budget was coming in 10 mil higher than desired. It all got shelved until the Francis Lawrence/ Will Smith version years later. We did get an interview on that version but there was next to no interest in makeup fx."

While fans of the original 1954 novella from Richard Matheson might have preferred Ridley Scott's vision of the film, the 2007 film ended up being a huge success, going on to earn more than $600 million worldwide. With no plans for a follow-up film on the horizon, we won't be surprised if we get an all-new incarnation of the story heading into development in the near future, which could potentially lean more into practical special effects than the 2007 film.

Do you think you would have preferred the Ridley Scott version? Let us know in the comments below or hit up @TheWolfman on Twitter to talk all things horror and Star Wars!

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