Katy Perry's Not The End Of The World Has Aliens Mistaking Zooey Deschanel For Her

In a new music video, pop star Katy Perry is taking advantage of what is likely an ongoing, if minor, frustration for laughs. Since Perry broke big a little over ten years ago, she has always had fans and critics noting how much she resembles actress Zooey Deschanel. Now, the joke (which can sometimes extend out to Emily Blunt or Paranormal Activity star Katie Featherston) has gone cosmic. In the video for "Not the End of the World," aliens targeting Perry accidentally abduct Deschanel instead, and hilarity ensues. Little do they know, at Christmastime, Deschanel is actually more of a catch thanks to reruns of Elf airing nonstop.

Ironically, with the "End of the World" in the title and a sci-fi premise, the song somewhat echoes the 2005 Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy movie -- which was comedic riff on the end of the world. In that movie, Deschanel was one of the main leads.

You can see the video below.

The video was filmed months ago, but debuted today. Perry took to her Instagram account to chat with Deschanel about the video and explain to fans how it came to be.

"I had this idea that Zooey would step in while I was taking a bit of a [maternity] leave," Perry said in the conversation. "For so long we've had this funny relationship...people think we look alike."

Deschanel added, "I've had full conversations with people who've thought I was you."

The scenes of Deschanel being taken on board a ship piloted by Perry-loving, blue-skinned alien are intercut with shots of Perry walking a stroller and talking to a baby, in a nod to the events that apparently gave birth to the whole video idea. No pun intended.

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"Not the End of the World" is the new single from Perry's August album Smile. The song also appeared on an EP released last week, Cosmic Energy," which was kind of like a Spotify playlist of Perry's space-themed songs, like "E.T." and "Wide Awake." The EP was timed to coincide with today's Jupiter-Saturn conjunction, which brings the two largest planets in our solar system as close together in our sky as they have been in centuries (although, due to the vagaries of these things, next time around won't take nearly as long).