Ubisoft Teases 'Splinter Cell's' Future

After the glorious tease of Sam Fisher earlier this year in a Ghost Recon: Wildlands crossover event, fans around the world were wondering if this mean the return of Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell series. With rumors having flared up once more in recent months, Ubisoft sat down to discuss the franchise's future.

"I love Splinter Cell," said Ubisoft Chief Creative Officer Serge Hascoet to Game Informer. recently "I love Prince of Persia. I can't disclose any information at this time, but I can say we are fighting for resources. It's not a question of will, it's a question of means."

The return to Splinter Cell is entirely doable given just how many studios Ubisoft has, and continues to open to this day. For the Creative Officer to be concerned over resources seems to be a bit of a cop-out, but who knows - perhaps this is a means for the company to garner fan interest before going full-steam ahead.

This also echoes what CEO Yves Guillemot told GameSpot just last month, "So I will disappoint you because I don't have an answer to give you exactly, but each brand we have, and each character, we want them to live in the long-term, so one day you will see something, but I can't give you more details."

Personally, I'd love to see a new Splinter Cell game. At this point, I'd be happy with a remaster of an older title. The franchise made its debut back in 2002, with its latest title making its arrival back in 2013. It's been five long years and I know I am far from alone when it comes to wanting to see Fisher once more in a full standalone game.

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Need a little Splinter Cell in your life right now? We get it! You can check out more on Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell: Blacklist below, according to Steam:

"The United States has a military presence in two-thirds of countries around the world, and some of them have had enough. A group of terrorists calling themselves The Engineers initiate a terror ultimatum called the Blacklist - a deadly countdown of escalating attacks on U.S. interests."