Nintendo Hits Super Mario 64 PC Port With Copyright Claims

A fan-made Super Mario 64 port on the PC platform is working its way towards an expected end now that Nintendo has reportedly filed copyright claims against the project. This version of Super Mario 64 touted better resolution options than the original way and gave players a new way to experience the classic after it was released online recently, but the fun didn’t last long. Videos and other traces of the game have now been hit with copyright claims with Nintendo supposedly behind the actions, a situation seen multiple times before regarding fan-made projects related to Nintendo’s most famous properties.

TorrentFreak reported on the actions taken against the fan-made project and said the claims levied against were reportedly organized by Wildwood Law Group LLC. The site said the law firm is known to work with Nintendo in efforts similar to this situation and cited a complaint which referenced the Super Mario 64 project.

“The copyrighted work is Nintendo’s Super Mario 64 video game, including the audio-visual work, software, and fictional character depictions covered by U.S. Copyright Reg. No. PA[REDACTED],” the claim read, according to the site.

With videos now being removed due while citing copyright claims as the reason, it’s only a matter of time before other evidence of the game’s existence and the game itself are scrubbed from the Internet. It’s a familiar process that we’ve seen play out before as Nintendo is known as one of the more litigious gaming companies when it comes to looking after its properties. The outcome of the game being taken down typically follows its rise in popularity, and though many accurately claim that publicizing these fan-made accelerates the process, it’s only a matter of time in any situation until the projects are taken down.

Mario Royale is one such example of this, a fan-made game that turned Nintendo’s poster character into a battle royale experience. The project appeared after the peak of the battle royale genre but still offered a new enough experience to entice people to check out the game. You played as Mario or a similar character and tried to outlive your opponents, but even though the creator tried to change things around to appease Nintendo, the project was ultimately shut down.

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