Here's What Reportedly Caused WWE to Change Its Policy About Wearing Masks

Ever since WWE moved all of its television tapings to the WWE Performance Center back in mid-March there have been a boatload of reports regarding how the company has (and hasn't) responded to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. One of the most recent came late last week when PWInsider reported that WWE is demanding that each employee wear a mask while inside the Performance Center (unless you're wrestling on television). A first violation will result in a fine of $500, and a second would cost you $1,000.

This policy is in stark contrast to how WWE was operating just a few weeks ago. According to Fightful, the change came when an unnamed prominent wrestler approached Vince McMahon.

"We've heard that the wrestler expressed his concerns about proper measures not being taken seriously enough, such as mask utilization and social distancing," Sean Ross Sapp reported. "This led to McMahon adding the rule that masks are mandatory and failure to comply will result in a fine."

On Monday Pro Wrestling Sheet reported that the total number of positive COVID-19 cases within the PC had reached 30 people. WWE has reportedly told wrestlers not to state publicly whether or not they have the virus, and only four employees have stepped forward so far — Renee Young, Kayla Braxton (for the second time), Jamie Noble and Adam Pearce.

The pandemic and WWE's subsequent response has resulted in certain Superstars stepping away from the television tapings, most notably Roman Reigns.

0comments

The company (WWE) has done everything that they can to make it the safest work environment possible. It is not the workplace that I was necessarily concerned about," Reigns explained in a recent interview with The Hindu. "The decision was taken mainly because each performer travels so much, and we are all such a diverse group and from all over the place. I'm not convinced, and I can't trust the fact that everybody is taking it as seriously and locking themselves down at home like I am. I trust my life with my co-workers every time I step foot in the ring, but I just can't put the same trust when it has my children, my wife and my family involved.

"But I don't want it to come off as I am taking a stand against the company at all, because I love the WWE. I've been a part of this company just since I was a little boy," he added. "That's why I always take it so personally when I represent them."

Disclosure: ComicBook is owned by CBS Interactive, a division of ViacomCBS.