Disney Boss Bob Iger Speaks Out on Rumors of Selling Company to Apple

Bob Iger has found himself back atop The Walt Disney Company, beginning his second stint as the Mouse's CEO earlier this month. Soon after Iger returned to his Burbank office, speculation started to spread online regarding acquisitions or sales the executive could make in his sophomore tenure as the Disney boss. One such idea that gained the most attraction was the idea that Apple could pony up enough cash to buy the entertainment juggernaut.

The speculation became so fervent, Iger addressed the concerns in a company-wide town hall meeting with employees on Monday. "We have a great set of assets here," Iger told employees in the meeting (via THR). "Nothing is forever, but I am very, very comfortable with each of the assets that we have."

During Iger's first go-around, Disney grew into the biggest studio in Hollywood, acquiring the likes of Marvel, Pixar, Lucasfilm, and 21st Century Fox. Now, Iger says they need to dive in with the assets they have and continue performing above expectations.

"I happen to believe that in creative businesses, there is tremendous value in working from the same place," the executive added. "It creates an energy, it is very enabling to creativity... I am not making any proclamations but I think that is extremely important."

In that same town hall, Iger addressed some of the company's controversies under his predecessor Bob Chapek. To that end, the chief executive added he doesn't like to see the company's name involved in any political controversies.

"I think there's a misperception here about what politics is," Iger added. "Some of the subjects that have been proven to be controversial as it relates to Disney have been branded political, and I don't think they are."

Earlier this year, Disney employees staged walkouts due to Chapek's initial response to Florida's "Don't Say Gay" bill.

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"Thank you to all who have reached out to me sharing your pain, frustration and sadness over the company's response to the Florida 'Don't Say Gay' bill. Speaking to you, reading your messages, and meeting with you have helped me better understand how painful our silence was," Chapek said after the very public outcry. "It is clear that this is not just an issue about a bill in Florida, but instead yet another challenge to basic human rights. You needed me to be a stronger ally in the fight for equal rights and I let you down. I am sorry. Our employees see the power of this great company as an opportunity to do good. I agree. Yes, we need to use our influence to promote that good by telling inclusive stories, but also by standing up for the rights of all."